Thank you, everyone!

By Elaine Leonge

113461

Folger MS v.b. 366, back cover

It’s time to close the book. 12 hours have passed, our fingers are sore and our computers are fast running out of batteries. I’m delighted to say that we completed our task! We now have a TRIPLE-KEYED transcription of Rebeckah Winche’s lovely recipe book. More on that in coming days…

Over the past 12 hours, we’ve encountered a wide array of medicinal and culinary know-how and are now armed with instructions to pickle turnips, distill aqua mirabilis, make a water for sore eyes, bake a cheese cake and much much more. With our brains filled to the brim and sunset nearly upon us, we’re heading out for a round of celebratory beer.

Before we do that, EMROC members would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to all those who joined us on this adventure. Being recipe lovers, we would also like to share with you two recipes which caught the eyes of the “Folger transcribers”.

FullSizeRenderDo let us know if you decide to try one of these at home! For now, good bye and good night.

A redy way to know the deseas called the Kings
evill
Take a grownd worme & lay itt alive to the place greved &
take a green docke leafe or 2 and lay them upon the worme
& bine them to the place at night when the patient goes to
bed & if it be the kings evill itt will turne to dust or poud
=er by the morning otherwise it will remayn dead in his owne
former forme as it was a live

A nother for the same deseas
Take a live toade & cut of one of her hinder legs
sewe it up in a pece of silke & hange it presently about the
neck of the party greeved. observe if it be a boy or man that
is greeved then a girl or  woman must kill the toade but if
a girle or woman be ill then a man must kill it
this hath cured many however if doth sertanly help the other
remydy or any other you shall apply to the sore (if any) to
worke the better efect & sooner cure.

To make pancakes
Take a pinte of creame 4 spoonfulls of fine
flower well fried 4 egges 3 quarters of a pound of
butter well clarefied season it wi th  salt & a little
nutmeg mixe it all very well together
there needs no butter to frie it, it is fat enough to
fry it self. thay must be very thin & in a small
frying pan.

Transcriptions courtesy of Breanne Weber, MA student University of North Carolina, Charlotte. Breanne won both the transcription sprints hosted at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Now you know whom to call when you need a seventeenth-century manuscript transcribed in a jiffy!

[The two recipes can be found in Folger MS v.b. 366, pages 63 and 80].

 

 

Transcribathon continues

Welcome to #transcribathon all those who have now joined us or will be shortly joining us from the University of Saskatchewan, University of Texas Arlington, Pacific Lutheran University, and the University of Colorado (Colorado Springs), as well as independent scholars from Ottawa, Calgary, and Australia!

The University of Saskatchewan crew

The University of Saskatchewan crew

We are going to be on a roll for our last three #transcribathon hours.

It’s on!

 

IMG_1548We woke up to a wonderful morning here in Washington and the EMROC/EMMO transcribathon is now underway. We’re a full house here, all working hard on the recipe book of Rebecca Winche. The book is a recent acquisition for the Folger Shakespeare Library and we’re so excited to be working on it.

The book contains a mixture of circa 150 culinary and medicinal recipes, including an early chocolate recipe, instructions to make a stewed and stuffed pigeon, a snail water, a nutmeg and raisin cheesecake and a number of fascinating cough remedies. One of these, in particular, involved dipping a licorice stick into a tincture of white wine vinegar, hyssop water, sugar and almond oil and “licke often of it”.

A little sleuthing suggests that the book at the centre of all this whirlwind activity once belonged to the Winche family of Hawnes/Haynes in Bedfordshire.

112243The book bears the ownership note of “Rebeckah Winche 1666” and was likely started by Rebeckah Brown Winche who was married to Sir Humphrey Winch, 1st Baronet (1622-1703) member of Parliament for Bedford. Rebeckah helpfully provides us with a brief genealogy at the back of the notebook and so we find out that Humphrey and Rebeckah were proud parents of Rebecca (b. 1660, married Thomas Lawley, Staffordshire, in 1681).

We’re still in the thick of things here and I will post more information about the manuscript and the transcribathon in a little while. For now, I’m dashing off to join the others.

Follow us on twitter @EMRecipesOnline – #transcribathon #FolgerEMMO!

IMG_1549

 

 

And we’re off!

By Lisa Smith

Alice Violett, Helen Kemp, Jake Millar (momentarily absent), Kim Shrive, David Rundle, Lisa Smith (taking photo)

Alice Violett, Helen Kemp, Jake Millar (momentarily absent), Kim Shrive, David Rundle, Lisa Smith (taking photo)

Here we are, all in our places with bright shining faces! It’s the first round of the Transcribathon, kicking off at the University of Essex from 11:00-14:00 (UK time), with transcribers joining in from Max Planck Institute (Berlin) and the University of York. Our participants in this round include a mix of undergraduates, postgraduates, postdoctoral fellows and lecturers.

There are two updates to the workflow for the day. First, we’re going to be triple-keying instead of just double-keying. For those non-techie people out there, that means every page will be entered three times by different people and then compared, which will ensure extra accuracy.

Once the triple keys are done, the members of the EMROC steering committee will be doing the checks for accuracy–or, reconciliation–as we go along throughout the day. The second update is a new innovation as of this week! Thanks to the Folger Shakespeare Library people making some last minute tweaks to the Dromio system, we will now be able to add in some tags (such as “ingredient” or “person”, etc.).

We’re really looking forward to seeing how far we get in producing a triple-keyed and tagged transcribed text by the end of our twelve hours.

Please come follow our progress as it happens on our Trello board or on Twitter.

Counting down the hours…

By Elaine Leong

Things are buzzing here at EMROC headquarters! Tomorrow, we are hosting the first ever annual EMROC transcribathon.

Scriptorium, 15th Century. From Project Gutenberg eText 16531: Old St. Paul's Cathedral, by William Benham. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

Scriptorium, 15th Century. From Project Gutenberg eText 16531: Old St. Paul’s Cathedral, by William Benham. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

On Wednesday, an international group of us will work collectively to transcribe the seventeenth-century recipe book of Rebecca Winche. Groups of transcribers will be joining us from the University of Essex (at 11 am UK time), the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (at noon Berlin time), the Folger Shakespeare Library (at 9 am, D.C. time), University of Saskatchewan, University of Texas, Arlington, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, Pacific Lutheran University and the Huntington Library (circa 2 pm West Coast time).

We’re pretty sure that this is the first international cross-timezone transcribathon in the the history of such events and we’re super excited to organize and host this digital humanities and pedagogical experiment. It’s not too late to join us. Just email Lisa Smith at lisa.smith@essex.ac.uk.

For those of you already signed-up and who’d like to take a sneak peak at the manuscript and familiarize yourself with the transcription system and more, visit our Transcribathon 101 page. However, no sneaky transcribing before Wednesday!

We will be live tweeting the event – join us at #transcribathon.

Get your keyboards ready, ladies and gentlemen.

An intriguing invitation

By Elaine Leong

winche sample page

v.b.366: “Receipt booke of Rebeckah Winche”

A seventeenth-century recipe book. Twelve hours. 208 pages. And transcribers from around the world.

Our goal? Using the Folger Shakespeare Library’s online transcription platform, we’ll collaboratively produce a searchable transcription of Rebeckah Winche’s recipe book in twelve hours.

On 7 October, please join the Early Modern Recipe Online Collective (EMROC) for our first annual Transcribathon. We will have transcription groups working at the Folger Shakespeare Library, the University of Essex, the University of Akron, the University of Saskatchewan and the University of Texas Arlington, with individuals joining in virtually throughout the day.

Along the way, participants will virtually meet scholars from around the world, have the opportunity to participate in a series of transcription sprints, and emerge from the day with a line for their CV—all from their own home, classroom, or office! NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY – we’ll walk you through the coding and offer pointers on the handwriting.

Even if you don’t want to transcribe, you can still join the fun in other ways.

For more information see here. To join us, email Lisa Smith (lisa.smith@essex.ac.uk).