Category Archives: Posts

Spring 2022 Transcribathon: Grace Carteret’s Recipes

11-12 February 2022
The Carteret Collection at the PCDP Conference

Come join us to transcribe the manuscript recipe book of Grace Carteret, 1st Countess Granville (1654-1744), housed at the Wellcome Collection! 

This event brings together participants in The Ohio State University’s Popular Culture and the Deep Past conference, devoted to “The Experimental Archaeology of Medieval and Renaissance Food,” and transcribers from around the world joining in from their home and classroom computers.

We’ll be working to transcribe Lady Carteret’s recipe collection (Wellcome MS.8903) and its wide array of culinary and medical recipes. Participants in this event will be helping to make Carteret’s manuscript keyword searchable, and in that process they’ll help illustrate the overlap between Carteret’s book and that of Ann Fanshawe, whose recipe collection was part of last year’s EMROC transcribathon. 

Click Here to Start Transcribing

Drop in any time — before, during, or after the event — and transcribe as long as you like! NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY – our webpages will help you through the coding and offer pointers on the handwriting.

Events on Saturday, February 12

  • 9:30 EST: At the PCDP Conference? Come visit EMROC on Saturday in the Creative Arts Room at the Ohio Union. Chatting and questions welcome!
  • 10:00 EST: Paper Presentation on learning to transcribe from University of Akron students Jasmine Beaulieu and Hannah Curtis, “Early Modern Recipe Transcription: The ‘Each One Teach One’ Method.” Join in person in the Ohio Room, or via Zoom here.

For more on the Carteret manuscript, check out detailed catalog record from the Wellcome.

Interested in joining our Transcribathon virtually? Contact Hillary Nunn, at nunn@uakron.edu, or just sign up to transcribe a page and jump in. Keep up with our events here on the EMROC webpage, and on Twitter.

We are grateful to the Folger Shakespeare Library for providing a customised transcription platform on FromthePage for this event.  And we are so glad that OSU’s Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies has included us in the conference events.

Key links

Transcription FAQ and information about Getting Started with Transcription.

Sample transcription from the Cartet manuscript.

EMROC blog (for quick and dirty blog posts as things happen, as well as more thoughtful posts later)

Twitter (for those of us live-tweeting the event, at #EMROCtranscribes)

CFP: EMSJ to mark EMROC’s tenth year

We are pleased to announce that Early Modern Studies Journal will be publishing a special issue entitled “Celebrating Ten Years of the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective.” We hope that you’ll consider submitting work to commemorate EMROC’s first decade of bringing together scholars, students and the general public in the preservation, transcription and analysis of recipes written in English from circa 1550-1800. Completed projects are due by February 1, 2022. For more details, please see this revised Call for Papers.

Sedley Transcription Now Available

The Royal College of Physicians has announced that the transcription of Lady Catherine Sedley’s manuscript, RCP 534, is now publicly available. Produced during our Spring transcribathon, the text is available here, via FromthePage. 

Pamela Forde of the RCP has also published a new blog entry about Lady Sedley’s manuscript to mark the occasion. Take a look here: https://history.rcplondon.ac.uk/blog/revealing-recipes-deciphering-text.

EMSJ to mark EMROC’s tenth year

EMROC is nearing the decade mark, and we want to mark the occasion!

We are pleased to announce that Early Modern Studies Journal will be publishing a special issue entitled “Celebrating Ten Years of the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective.” We hope that you’ll consider submitting work to commemorate EMROC’s first decade of bringing together scholars, students and the general public in the preservation, transcription and analysis of recipes written in English from circa 1550-1800.

The issue will contain essays that demonstrate the work that EMROC’s efforts transcribing recipes have enabled. 

We imagine two different types of essays in this issue:

  • A core of 5-6 scholarly essays, 7,000-10,000 words and peer reviewed, that call upon EMROC for their materials or their inspiration. Such works might illustrate analysis of recipes or recipe collections, early modern medicine and/or cookery, transcription as pedagogy, or digital humanities approaches to recipe texts. 
  • A selection of shorter essays, 1,000-2,000 words and not peer reviewed, that comment upon EMROC’s presence in the field. These essays might comment on the impact of EMROC events, recount experiences collaborating on recipe work, or outline contributions to EMROC’s efforts.

The journal, housed at http://www.uta.edu/english/emsjournal/, uses a double-blind peer review process, so this publication should meet tenure and promotion requirements (for the scholarly articles). The digital nature of the journal allows easy integration of online sources and innovative presentations of our work. Essays can link to online repositories (of manuscript texts and images, as well as other open access online works) as well as to sources like blogs and videos. As a result, our journal issue can offer a rare chance to present innovative media presentations to peer reviewers in the recipe field. 

Completed projects are due by December 15, 2021. For more details, please see the attached Call for Papers.

“Revealing Recipes” Workshop Video Now Available

The 2021 “Revealing Recipes: Top Tips from Early Modern Women” workshop is now available  here. Hosted by the Wellcome Collection and organized in tandem the Royal College of Physicians, the event kicked off EMROC’s annual transcribathon, and its speakers offer fantastic background on the manuscripts, transcription, and digitization. If you want to share an introduction to early modern recipes and transcription, this is a fantastic source.

Here’s what you can see discussed: 

  • The Wellcome recipe collection (Richard Aspin, former Head of Special Collections at Wellcome Collection)​
  • The power of remedy books for the modern reader (Helen Wakely, Inclusive Collections Lead, Wellcome Collection)​
  • Household medicinal recipes (Anne Stobart, University of Exeter)​
  • BREAK​
  • Digitizing the recipe books (Christy Henshaw, Digital Production Manager, Wellcome Collection)​
  • Conserving recipe books (Elizabeth Fagg-Shuttlewood , Conservator, Wellcome Collection)​
  • EMROC and transcribing as a teaching resource (Jennifer Munroe, Professor of English, University of North Carolina and co-founder of EMROC)​
  • Q&A​ (all panellists including Pamela Forde, Head of Archives at the Royal College of Physicians, London)