Category Archives: Posts

Our New Year’s Resolution: More Searchable Recipe Manuscripts

The year 2019 ended with some exciting news. Six new recipe manuscript transcriptions have now been vetted and uploaded into LUNA’s Folger Manuscript Transcription Collections.  This now makes recipes from 49 different manuscripts made searchable thanks in part to the transcription help of EMROC and its members.

Most notable is the quick availability of Folger Manuscript V.b.400, which we hope rings a bell.  MS V.b.400 was the subject of 2019’s fifth international transcribathon. Over three hundred unique transcribers brought the seventeenth-century collection to transcription conclusion on November 7.  Within a month, through the herculean vetting efforts of Nicole Winard, Bob Tallaksen, and Sarah Powell, the manuscript was made ready for uploading into the database.  Finally, Emily Wahl, Folger Metadata Librarian, added the transcriptions to the ever-growing collection of searchable pages. Those who have encountered the anonymous manuscript do not need to be told of its unique character, and the hope is that its presence within the LUNA collection will further illuminate its position within recipe book history.

A chart of “medicinall characters” found in Folger V.b.400, fol. 21

Even though EMROC did not have a hand in their transcription, there’s much to be excited about in the other five manuscripts as well. Folger MS V.a.396, the recipe collection of Penelope Jephson Patrick from 1671, has long been in the Folger’s possession and has added interest as the compiler’s husband would become Bishop of Ely in 1675.  Folger MS V.a.397 was compiled by a woman named Katherine Brown in the mid-seventeenth century and contains a prayer to be recited by someone who is ill. MS W.a. 317 is an anonymously compiled eighteenth-century cookbook that contains several Indian recipes, and V.a.125 is a verse miscellany compiled by Richard Boyle, Earl of Burlington, that includes many pages of receipts. Finally, Folger Manuscript W.a.318, Cookery and medicinal recipes, was compiled by Dorothy Pennyman in the eighteenth century.

The variety represented within and between these various collections is seemingly limitless. Our hopes for 2020 are that new doors into historical recipes research will continue to open and that we may continue to point to the potentials here.

Folger MS V.b.400 = TRANSCRIBED

All 248 pages with the required  keyings.  314 unique log-ins with at least as many transcribers.  Three continents and five countries. Thank you to all who joined us November 5 and helped make EMROC’s Fifth Annual Transcribathon a rousing success! 

Especial thanks to speakers Amanda Herbert, Sara Pennell, and Anne Stobart for sharing their expertise during the event.  

Welcome to #EMROCtranscribes 2019!

Good morning everyone from the University of Essex contingent! Welcome to EMROC’s fifth annual transcribathon. Pull up a chair. Pour yourself some tea. Tune in to our 2019 EMROCK Spotify list… And get ready to transcribe!

Full details on the day are in our previous post.

We will be transcribing v.b.400. Go to transcribe.folger.edu. Select ‘transcribathons’. Then ‘EMROC’. The text we’re doing will be near the bottom.

We’ll be busy on Twitter and the Zoom video link today. (https://essex-university.zoom.us/j/706439992). Please drop by and say hi. Join in throughout the day by sharing interesting tidbits or hashtagging recipes.

Can’t wait to see you online, fellow transcribers. It’s going to be a fun day.

 

 

Remember, remember, the fifth of November

Our 2019 transcribathon is coming soon… November 5! Flex those fingers, boot up your computer, and get ready to join in, because this is no ordinary transcribathon.

We have lots of exciting activities planned to accompany our transcribing delights, which will run from 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. GMT.

There will be:

Joining Zoom

Zoom is an easy-to-use platform that enables participants to ask the EMROC team questions throughout the day and to chat with other transcribers. You don’t need any special tools, either. Just click on our Zoom link, download the exe (if you don’t already have Zoom), and you’ll be in. There are details here on how to join, participate, and leave. We are hoping that the chat and Q&A functions on Zoom will make it easier for novice transcribers to get help quickly, as well as bring the transcriber community together.

Speakers

The Department of History at the University of Essex is also hosting an EMROC panel on ‘Recipes in the Making’, which focuses on the manuscript we’re transcribing. Speakers include Amanda Herbert (Folger Shakespeare Library), Sara Pennell (Greenwich), and Anne Stobart (Exeter).

The panel will be recorded, though it won’t be up immediately…

Survey?

We would love it if you filled in our pre-transcribathon survey, which will take no more than five minutes of your time. The survey will help us to learn more about our participants’ interests and backgrounds.

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/7T9HKR5

If you want to join in or have other questions, please do let me know on Twitter (@historybeagle) or by email (lisa.smith@essex.ac.uk).

Thank you so much for your interest in our transcribathon and for filling in the survey. We are so excited to be transcribing with you on November 5.